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"Why are Indian reservations so poor?"
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DeadAwake



Joined: 17 Feb 2007
Posts: 562
Location: Aus.
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It was pure conjecture. Just some general observations applied to their situation, bearing no relation to the aboriginals situation. I know next nothing about their situation either.

A casino plays into what i say. It is owned by an individual or a select few. The people that work there "leech" currency off the owners. On top, it collects wealth from the community and funnels it into a few hands (More "customers" than staff). Whether the proprietors put this into the community or not isnt guaranteed. The majority, probably, goes toward the expansion of the establishment. It is a monetary black hole, moreso sucking the community dry rather than watering it.

What you say about trauma is interesting. One thing id say, is it engenders in some the aversion of investing into western "culture". Which leads to the question, do they even want to develop their community and gain riches? Maybe for some of them, our way of life is a temporary until they can figure out how to return to living off the land. Of course, it will never be the same, with natural resources exhausted. Would those who plan such a course divulge this info to outsiders?

Speaking of Feudalism. As I see (and good deal of others, I assume) CEO's/bankers etc are kings, conglomerations/corporations the kingdoms. I do not think there is much separating us from the Middle Ages, just a different facade, a new face, the thin veneer of “civility”, “refinement” and complexity of systemization. The middle class, the lower class, live off table scraps of the upper class. The governors and thus, we, are governed by the acquisition of money, technology and in some cases “power”.

It is difficult for me to be convinced otherwise.
Post Fri Jan 25, 2013 9:56 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8501
Location: Third Coast
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DeadAwake wrote:
A casino plays into what i say. It is owned by an individual or a select few. The people that work there "leech" currency off the owners. On top, it collects wealth from the community and funnels it into a few hands (More "customers" than staff). Whether the proprietors put this into the community or not isnt guaranteed. The majority, probably, goes toward the expansion of the establishment. It is a monetary black hole, moreso sucking the community dry rather than watering it.


This is only partially tue with Native American casinos. They are owned by the tribe as a whole, but administered by the tribal council. Per the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, a certain percentage of all income is supposed to go back to the tribe. Does this always happen? No, as Native Americans are still human beings, and just as prone to greed and corruption as the next person. So, occasionally you have a corrupt member of the tribal council who siphons funds from off the top. Even when this is not the case, funds do not always get spent on what the should be, like appropriate housing, clean water systems, infrastructure, and the like. But you are generalizing in your post. While what you mentioned does happen, it is not always the case. There are, in fact, some vary prosperous tribes out there, all as a result of savvy casino operations. For an example, peep this:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/09/us/more-casinos-and-internet-gambling-threaten-shakopee-tribe.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

You can see in the article how large per capita incomes would skew unemployment statistics. When one receives over a million dollars a year for doing nothing, this certainly doesn't inspire people to take up jobs. The Sandia Pueblo in New Mexico are also quite successful, as are the southeastern Seminole. The point is, not every reservation is poor, mismanaged, or otherwise disreputable.

Also, you're making an assumption about Native people wanting to return to living off the land. Most that I have talked to don't. But this is not the same as striving for the preservation of culture, which is a very big part of Native American communities. I'm sure there are those that yearn for the old days, but most have adapted to modern society and appear content with the the many amenities it provides. Again, driving a pick-up truck does not preclude indigenism or tribalism. I have been to a few powwows, and they are lively, spirited affairs that preserve practices hundreds of years old. They also afford the general public to be exposed to Native American culture in a number of different ways, including language and food (fried bread is where it's at). Finally, they offer alternative sources of income through the sale of crafts and the like.
Post Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:12 am
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DeadAwake



Joined: 17 Feb 2007
Posts: 562
Location: Aus.
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Okay, you have proven me wrong.

It wasnt exactly an assumption, but rather a stated possibility. Point being, we only see the external effects of certain inner processes of people. That there is a possibility that their state of poverty may be a temporary choice, at least in some instances. And there may be other such possibilities, but they are invisible to ordinary perspectives.

Yes, i can agree that adopting certain aspects of western cultrue doesnt mean they have completely abandoned their own.
Post Sun Jan 27, 2013 7:49 pm
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Sage Francis
Self Fighteous


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
Posts: 21527
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Since it's directly related to what we've been discussing here, I wanted to share this AMA from Reddit:

"I am a native american social worker working on a USA Indian Reservation."
http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/18yfd0/i_am_a_native_american_social_worker_working_on_a/
Post Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:23 pm
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Limbs



Joined: 04 Feb 2011
Posts: 861
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I only skimmed the thread so forgive me if its irrelevant but I don't know how it can't be relevant.

Makoons wrote:
I would say the majority have some form of traditional belief but like any spirituality it varies from person to person. We try to integrate it into our social work if it is what appeals to the family...we've used traditional healers to work with those struggling with substance abuse, to heal victims of sexual and physical abuse, and to mediate family arguments. I think most government facilities here try to use spirituality. They do a weekly prayer and drum circle at the tribal school, they open each official government meeting with sage and a prayer...we integrate it as much as possible.


http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/18yfd0/i_am_a_native_american_social_worker_working_on_a/c8j4bb3
Post Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:01 am
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Limbs



Joined: 04 Feb 2011
Posts: 861
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How do we tear down the walls? How do we become less different? How can we agree on a common goal? Just one.

The differences seem to be the issue. How do we become more similar? So much more similar we evolve into a sing... Sorry been listening to Eyedea. ;)

Anyway, there wouldn't be conflicts any more. Theoretically? The robots never had a civil war.
Post Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:54 am
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C.R.A.Z.Y



Joined: 18 Feb 2008
Posts: 2719
Location: Vote for me and i'll vote for you.
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isolation from the overall communities that are non reservation communities is a serious factor.
Post Wed Feb 27, 2013 1:39 pm
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