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"Working Man" review by Stepdad Mag. Some great in
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"Working Man" review by Stepdad Mag. Some great in  Reply with quote  

Another great review from Stepdad Mag!

“When so many underground rappers are staking their careers on creating music to appeal to indie-rock sensibilities, Prolyphic proves that remaining true to the sound he was raised on can still be innovative.”

http://stepdadmag.com/workingman.html

Written by Bruce King

Sage Francis’ Rhode Island based Strange Famous Records has been putting out some of the best underground hip-hop records while no one’s been looking. This writer is comfortable calling them Rhymesayers of the Northeast. And similar to how Rhymesayers has at their core the three Minneapolis heavyweights Atmosphere, Brother Ali, and POS as their blue chips center pieces, Strange Fame has Providence hard hitters B Dolan, Sage, and Prolyphic. The problem is many people have failed to discover the third of the trifecta. That needs to change and Prolyphic’s new record “Working Man” may be just the record to do it.

Prolyphic’s 2008 collaboration LP with Reanimator “The Ugly Truth” was a beautiful album filled with vulnerable word play and progressive beats. One of the lead singles from that record “Two Track Mind” could easily function as an introspective, moody love letter to one’s intimate. On “Working Man” where the beats are provided by SFR’s Buddy Peace, that progression is replaced with a return to the sort of boom-bap that used to grace EPMD and Bomb Squad productions. Fans of 90s hip-hop will be pleased.

Lyrically the delivery is both aggressive and thoughtful, but far more sure of itself than it was in Prolyphic’s previous releases. Social issues are heavily addressed from a critical perspective. In the song “Drug Dealer” the wordsmith directs his frustrations at pharmaceutical industry. “Go Green” is a track that explores the inner conflict of wanting to live a conscious life in a consumerist society, especially when activism is often little more than a marketing ploy. Finally on “Six Feet High” he describes what his family went through when his father’s machine shop business was destroyed by flood waters. Issues with FEMA, communal ties strained by profit motives, and the superficiality of empty gestures all find a way into this very personal tale.

The record isn’t all weight and politics though. My favorite track on the record is “Death of the Boombox”, a declaration of rebirth in an era where discussion of “the death of hip-hop” is the trendy catch phrase of critics and artists alike. This album is laid on the bedrock of rap’s golden era. However, it builds on what made that time so great. When so many underground rappers are staking their careers on creating music to appeal to indie-rock sensibilities, Prolyphic proves that remaining true to the sound he was raised on can still be innovative, and it may just be enough to gain the attention of fan base that he deserves.

www.tinyurl.com/WorkingManLP
Post Sat May 11, 2013 7:40 pm
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