Profile
Search
Register
Log in
Apple granted patent for infrared recording restrictions...
View previous topic | View next topic >

Post new topic Reply to topic
Strange Famous Forum > The General Forum

Author Message
sewer samuel



Joined: 08 Dec 2008
Posts: 225
Location: oakland ca.
Apple granted patent for infrared recording restrictions...  Reply with quote  

http://9to5mac.com/2016/06/28/apple-patent-infra-red-block-photos/

One of the things that really spoils live concerts these days is that half the people there don’t seem to want to watch it live at all – they’d rather watch it through their phone screen, holding the device up and blocking the view of those behind them. This is a problem Apple is seeking to solve in a patent first applied for in 2011 and granted today …

The patent describes the camera detecting an infrared signal and interpreting the data. One signal could be used to disable both still photography and video recording.

For example, an infrared emitter can be located in areas where picture or video capture is prohibited, and the emitter can generate infrared signals with encoded data that includes commands to disable the recording functions of devices. An electronic device can then receive the infrared signals, decode the data and temporarily disable the device’s recording function based on the command.

The same approach could be used to prevent video recording in movie theaters, and to block photography in sensitive locations.

If it all sounds a bit negative, the same patent describes some more positive uses of the technology. In a museum, for example, the system could be used to automatically display information about the object you’re viewing or photographing.

An infrared emitter can be located near an object and generate infrared signals with encoded data that includes information about that object. An electronic device can then receive the infrared signals, decode the data and display the information about the object to the user.

It’s possible that the technology described by the patent has been superseded by things like iBeacons, which could conceivably trigger the same kind of functionality more reliably – infrared feels like a rather elderly method of data-transmission these days. But it’s interesting that Apple is exploring this area, and if it results in people at concerts keeping their phones in their pockets and actually watching the concert, I for one will be happy!



I like the idea of this. (With artist's consent).

But on the other hand, how long until this technology becomes easy/compact enough for law enforcement to use?
Post Thu Jun 30, 2016 4:26 pm
 View user's profile Send private message
anomaly
Loserface


Joined: 22 May 2008
Posts: 2674
 Reply with quote  

I support this. I'm guilty of snapping a photo or two, but the people that watch the entire show while shooting video annoy the shit out of me.

But someone will just come out with cameras that don't take the signal.
Post Thu Jun 30, 2016 5:51 pm
 View user's profile Send private message
Mark in Minnesota



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
Posts: 2110
Location: Saint Louis Park, MN
 Reply with quote  

I think tech like this is fundamentally anti-consumer. But it's not really a big innovation; QR codes in a spectrum that cameras can see but the human eye cannot. The idea that these invisible-to-the-naked-eye codes should lock out phone functionality which is available by default is insanely awful.

If phone manufacturers all do this, eventually some police department will exploit this feature in standard issue equipment for patrol cars and riot squad uniforms--or, worse, corrupt police will privately purchase equipment which does it and use it without formal department permission. Celebrities will start exploiting it for anti-paparazzi purposes, wearing jewelry or specialized clothing which project the infrared signal. Pranksters and trolls will do it in public places where digital photography is the common expectation: school plays, graduation ceremonies, parties.

Controlling against these unintended uses can't be reasonably done. You could try to cryptographically mutate the control signal with GPS location data and time data, and maybe you can encode enough bits of information into the infrared signal to convey a full crypto text rather than a simpler control signal such that phones will only obey the signal if it was signed for that time and location--but now whatever crypto key you're using to sign those secrets becomes a target for every abuser in the world, some of whom can seize a copy of the key from you via secret warrant--plus your messages are subject to known-ciphertext attacks which make the challenge of encryption much greater than it is for arbitrary messages.

All it takes is that master key eventually being hacked loose the way DVD and Blu-Ray keys were eventually hacked loose, and now you have to disable the tech in every device where you included it--or you end up in a world where any random jerk can remotely disable photography functions in every nearby phone.
Post Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:03 am
 View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
anomaly
Loserface


Joined: 22 May 2008
Posts: 2674
 Reply with quote  

I'm gonna build my own and start robbing banks like a muffucka
#youcantfilmmemuthafuckaaaa
Post Fri Jul 01, 2016 9:08 pm
 View user's profile Send private message
Brynjar



Joined: 12 Dec 2006
Posts: 1502
Location: Rivertown
 Reply with quote  

I like this in theory.
The cynic in me does not.
Post Sat Jul 02, 2016 11:23 am
 View user's profile Send private message

Post new topic Reply to topic
Jump to:  

All times are GMT - 6 Hours.
The time now is Fri Jul 29, 2016 8:01 am
  Display posts from previous:      


Powered by phpBB: © 2001 phpBB Group
Template created by The Fathom
Based on template of Nick Mahon